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Ibrahim I Cisse Class of 1922 CD Assistant Professor
Physics

Ibrahim Cissé works from first principles to study emergent phenomena in live cells with single molecule sensitivity, and applies novel biophysical approaches to investigate weak and transient biological interactions. Cissé applies “super-resolution” techniques to highly dynamic, collective behaviors in living cells, using quantitative, fluorescent methods capable of high spatial localization (in the tens of nanometers, well below the optical diffraction limit ) and high temporal resolution (in tens of milliseconds) to apprehend emergent phenomena. Cissé also works to bring to light the poorly understood roles of weak and transient interactions in the regulation of such molecular mechanisms as genome maintenance, nuclear organisation and gene expression regulation. Weak and transient interactions often include biomolecular complexes with high dissociation constants resistant to commonly used in vitro biochemical approaches, or proteins that require too high a copy number for in vivo detection with conventional fluorescent microscopy. Cissé’s lab seeks to overcome these limitations by taking new approaches based on single-molecule imaging.

Cissé came to MIT from HHMI’s Janelia Farm Research Campus where he was in the Transcription Imaging Consortium.  He is originally from Niger, but moved to the US and attended North Carolina Central University, where he received his BS in Physics. He completed his graduate work in physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and then moved to the École Normale Supérieure, where he was a Pierre Gilles de Gennes fellow and a European Molecular Biology Organization long-term fellow.  

 

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

t: 617-253-4446 Room: 68-371

IN THE NEWS

CONTACT INFORMATION

t: 617-253-4446 Room: 68-371

Education

  • Ph.D. 2009, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN